Krista Munger

Krista Munger has been working as a conservationist and science educator in the Hudson Valley since 1997. She grew up rambling in nearby woods and is raising her daughter to do the same. Her other interests include gardening, cross-country skiing and canoeing.

Out with the lawn, in with the meadow

In last week’s blog post I reported that the Pound Ridge Land Conservancy recently oversaw the mowing of their five-acre meadow on the Clark Preserve as a way of preserving it as an open habitat and supporting the animals that call it home.  This week, the meadow conversation continues with a focus on all the cool ways that people are bringing meadows and meadow plants into their landscaping.  Really big meadows like the ones at Ward-Pound Ridge Reservation are impressive, but not feasible for the average landowner to own or maintain.  The alternative?  Small meadow gardens.        

Out with the lawn, in with the meadow!
Native meadows have become a fashionable, beautiful and ecologically intelligent type of landscaping over the past decade. Their benefits abound: they require far less water and mowing than a manicured lawn, they require ZERO fertilizers, their appearance changes with the seasons, they support populations of native plants and they attract a variety of wildlife. My friends in Pound Ridge – James and Ellen Best – have beautiful meadows incorporated into their landscaping; their backyard feels less like a generic landscape and more like real nature.  Here is what James and Ellen Best have to say about their meadow gardens:

What we like best about meadows is that they dramatically change with the seasons, unlike grass, which hardly changes at all. Cycles of purple, pink and yellow flowers, wispy grasses, buzzing bees and incredible spider webs appear in the meadows; it’s an ongoing show that nature puts on for free. We see fox, hawks, woodchucks, rabbits and more in the natural, protective habitat that the meadows create. After a dry, brownish winter, when the meadow begins to come alive again in the spring, it’s so exciting! Yes, patches of grass offer good foot-feel and space for activities, like a carpet. But how much carpet do you need? Less work, too!



A mowed path through a dense patch of wildflowers at the Best’s property in Pound Ridge, NY



A patch of black eyed susan next to the Best’s home in Pound Ridge, NY.

The Bests go on to say:
The combination of having both meadow and lawn areas seems like the best option. We have winding paths running through the meadows, making it an adventure to walk from one area to another. And it doesn’t have to be in a big area to give us that experience. Meadows provide borders and edges, as well as natural transitions from wooded areas to lawn areas – so much more alive than just a mowed lawn!

 

A tree swallow.  This bird can be seen flying over meadows picking off flying insects.  You are likely to attract these birds, especially if your meadow is near a pond. 
 
A lone cardinal flower grows in a patch of colorful flowers on the property of James and Ellen Best, Pound Ridge, NY. 
 
It seems as if meadow landscapes and native landscapes are popping up all over the place. In just a 20 minute internet search, I found all of the following websites.

See this company, which specializes in ‘organic’ landscaping.  Another company can consult on your property, or insall a thriving meadow.
See an example of landscaping turned wild here from North Salem, NY
Native U, a program at Westchester Community College, is dedicated to teaching gardeners and landscapers how to incorporate native plants and native ecology into their work.
A word from NY State on practicing native landscaping here
This Blog documents work in the ‘Urban Lawn Reduction Project’.

Interested in managing the meadow on your property?
Check out this pamphlet on meadow management put out by the Mianus River Gorge.

Meadow management at the Armstrong Preserve.
On the Pound Ridge Land Conservancy’s Armstrong Preserve there is an old field, which is colonized by invasive stilt grass and japanese barberry.  I recently drafted a Meadow Management Plan for the Pound Ridge Land Conservancy which outlines a long-term plan to bring native meadow plants back to the field.  Over the next five years we can expect more native grasses and wildflowers, bees, butterflies and dragonflies!     

*All pictures by James Best

A meadow is a terrible thing to waste

The Pound Ridge Land Conservancy owns or holds conservation easements on 17 preserves in Pound Ridge, NY. The biggest – at 70 acres – is the Clark Preserve, on Autumn Ridge Road. This preserve is a fair representation of Pound Ridge’s ecology; up high its got patches of exposed bedrock where oaks hang on for dear life, down low its got wetlands full of red maple and ferns, and everywhere in between grows a dry forest over hilly, rocky terrain. A unique feature of the Clark Preserve, and one that draws many each week, is its beautiful meadow. In the simplist terms, the Clark meadow is a refreshing change of pace; it permits a grand, open view and induces a feeling of expansiveness that the forest can not. Likewise, in ecological terms, the meadow refreshes the landscape; the open, grassy habitat supports mammals, birds, insects and reptiles that the forest does not. The bounty of the meadow interacts with the bounty of the forest to support those animals – such as the fox, hawk or box turtle – that rely on both ecosystems. An ecologist would say that ‘the meadow increases landscape diversity’.   

Here, in the eastern part of the U.S., meadows don’t usually stay meadows for long. This is really a tree’s world and before long, every meadow will become colonized by woody plants. While on one hand this change is totally natural, on the other hand we have a limited amount of meadows left and, without active management, they would simply go away. Essentially, if we want meadows (which a lot of people like for a lot of different reasons) then we must mow them to keep out trees and shrubs. This is exactly what we did at the Clark Preserve last week.

 
A mower at the Clark meadow in late September. 
  

In this picture, half of the Clark meadow is mowed.  By the end of the day, the entire meadow was mowed. 

By mowing the meadow we killed the small shrubs that were starting to grow in the meadow.  The meadow’s non-woody plants – grasses, flowers, ferns, etc. – will grow again next year.  In meadow management, different mowing cycles are used to benefit and attract different animals.  See this pamphlet, put out by the Mianus River Gorge, on the frequency and timing of meadow mowing. 

If meadows naturally turn into woodlands and forests, why should we keep a meadow open? 
Or, asked a slightly different way…
Aren’t we interferring with natural succession when we mow a meadow?
Eastern meadows – when left a lone – usually become colonized by woody shrubs and trees through a somewhat predictable series of vegetation changes.  The following graphic depicts how a place’s plants may change through time. 

A very general depiction of ‘succession’, the change in vegetation over time. 

So yes, it is well known that meadows turn into forests, but this does not mean that meadows are somehow less ‘natural’ or less important than forests.  As landscape features, meadows have always been right alongside forests.  If we consider the entire eastern forest – from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic Ocean – before it was dominated by industrialism, there were thousands of meadows dotting the forested landscape.  Fires would burn and open up forests to create meadows.  Beaver dams, after being breached, would drain their ponds and leave a wide open meadow.  Disturbances such as these were always making meadows out of shrublands and woodlands.  So at the same time as natural succession was turning meadows into forests, the forests themselves were being converted into meadows.  Within this simple equation, there was always a place for meadows in the eastern landscape and, thus, many animals evoloved to live within their open, grassy vistas. 

Today, its a different ballgame: fires are squelched and beavers are a mere fraction of their former abundance.  No meadows are being created while the remaining meadows proceed through succession into forests.  Given enough time, we will simply run out of meadows – hence the need for meadow management.  When we manage for a perpetual meadow we secure habitat for all the butterflies, birds, dragonflies and turtles that rely on them. 

Becuase of their ecological and cultural history, meadows are the focus of conservation in Westchester County.  Many uncommon birds and insects flock to these areas, attracting naturalists with binoculars and cameras.  The following are managed meadows open to the public:
Westchester Land Trust’s Pine Croft Meadow  
Ward Pound Ridge Reservation
Bedford Audubon’s headquesters is surrounded by fields
Marshland Conservancy

 
 
On a side note, I can reccomend two good books on the subject of America’s historic landscape. 
1491: New Revalations of the Americas Before Columbus
Paradise Found: Nature in America at the Time of Discovery
 
 
 

Keeping your garden warm through the fall

Here comes fall again…its seems like just yesterday I had ample daylight to do with as I pleased: after-dinner hikes, early morning bird walks, flexibility to do my garden chores whenever they fit in.  Now, I am scrambling to get everything done before it gets dark.  The revolving seasons change the way we are currently gardening at the Armstrong Education Center.  We can’t create more hours of sunlight, but we can surely govern the micro climate in our garden to keep temperatures  – and production – from dropping too low.  There are many techniques for what is commonly called ‘season extension’, which generally means growing crops beyond their normal outdoor growing season.  Some forms of season extension – such as the greenhouse – certainly ring a bell with most people.  Lesser known methods with interesting names such as ‘row covers‘, ‘hoop houses‘ and ‘cold frames‘ are actually used regularly among small to medium sized agricultural operations.

Row covers, used to extend the growing season, at the Armstrong Education Center.
Underneath the row cover.  Inside, our swiss chard, kale and carrots will get some early winter protection.  

This week at the Armstrong Education Center gardens, Sarah Bush and I installed Agribon AG-19 row covers over our remaining crops of salad greens, carrots, beets and herbs.  This material will provide protection against early frosts and, until then, keep the beds from cooling off on cold nights.  In addition to season extension, row covers are used for a variety of other reasons including pest control and preventing wind damage.  Just googling ‘row covers’ will yield dozens of helpful sites and hundreds of pictures.  
         
On a personal level, learning about row covers and season extension opened my eyes to the commitment, skills, knowledge, and ingenuity of the farming community.  When I first saw season extension I thought “Wow, these people just wont give up!”.  I first encountered season extension in Alaska where, with only a three month growing season I expected not to find many farmers, but I did.  Growers in Alaska take advantage of the looooong days, which help crops grow almost before their eyes.  To get a jumpstart on the late season and to hang onto it as long as possible, the Alaskan growers that I met used various methods of season extension.

Alaska Grown is a state program that promotes Alaska state agriculture

To me, these techniques represent a certain strain of resilience, stubbornness and dedication that I am finding to be universal among food growers.  I am learning from these growers that to keep a productive and sustainable garden requires us to master the art and science raising plants.  At the Armstrong House, productivity and sustainability are goals and in only our first growing year, we are learning a lot.  To increase productivity and sustainability in the future, we have much more planning and learning to do; our row covers are just the beginning.  Stay tuned to see what else we try.

For the region’s authority on growing, gardening, farming and agriculture see Stone Barns.  Visit their website at least, but do yourself a favor and visit their farms, sit in on a class and participate in a workshop.  A recent trip to their greenhouse, hoop houses, orchards and compost arena left me speechless.  They really know how to grow food over there.            

Seasons of want and plenty

I’m not a foodie but I have a couple foodie friends who would rather eat dirt than a winter tomato from the supermarket.  After hearing their arguments and giving my taste buds some time to reflect, I am beginning to agree.  At the Armsrong Education Center, I am trying something new this year: my partner, Sarah, and I bought 40 pounds of organic heirloom tomatos from Amawalk Farm in Katonah, NY, and processed them into sauce for the winter.  Come January, when the mealy tomatoes get shipped in from who knows where, we will be thawing out bags of tomato sauce for pastas, pizzas, chillis and more.  Here is what the process looked like:    
We met a farmer and asked if we could buy slightly damaged tomatoes at a reduced price.  They were happy to sell off tomatoes that weren’t otherwise marketable.  After a quick trip to their farm, we came home with two big boxes of assorted heirloom tomatoes. 

A quick rinse

Some of the tomatoes were a bit under ripe so we set them aside to eat in a few days.  They will not be made into sauce.  This informative pictures appeared on the side of the tomato box.  The tomato faces are cute. 
We cut up the sauce tomatoes and removed any damaged parts.  On average, each tomato had one or two small spots that needed to be cut out and composted.  This step took roughly 2 hours. 
  
We placed the tomatoes into a oven pan and added good olive oil, salt and cloves of garlic.  We broiled the tomatoes for roughly 25 minutes.  We stirred the tray two times to make sure the garlic didn’t burn. 
  

Amazing



We spooned the sauce into freezer bags

Mmmmmmmmmmmmm



What does freezing bags of tomato sauce have to do with Living Lighter on the Land?
1)  Food is nature, nature is food.  We can’t fully understand and appreciate nature without understanding our food and bigger ‘food systems’.  We may not think of a single asparagus plant as part of the ecosystem, but when you consider our country’s land cover, agriculture plays no small role.  In America, the millions of acres of agriculutral land (formerly wild forests, prairies and wetlands) still connect with the greater ecosystems through their soil, water, plants, animals and the atmoshphere.  There’s no two ways about it: our agricultural operations are big part of our new ecosystems.  To rethink your place in nature is to rethink your place in your food system. 
When I thaw out my sauce in the winter I will know exactly where it came from, who picked it, who shipped it, who cleaned it, who cooked it, and who bagged it.  That’s food safety.  Also, I will know how the farm operates, the philosophy of the farmers, how the farmers treat their land and how the farm fits into the greater ecosystem.  That’s land stewardship. 
2) Eating in season, or perhaps more accurately stated, buying in season.  When we buy food out of season, that food gets shipped from very far away.  Southern California and Florida are the closest large winter-food producing regions, and much of our winter food comes from Central and South America.  A tomato that travels 3,000 miles (and the fuel that was required to do so) doesn’t make a lot of sense to me.  I’d rather buy it from a farm five miles away and freeze it.       
Freezing is just one option.  You can pickle, jar, smoke, cure, and dehydrate your food to keep it for the winter.  It’s surely not easier than driving to the supermarket, but it puts you back in control of your food.  Plus, you can feel good knowing that you would have made your grandmother proud. 

Land stewardship is kind of like a cocktail


Adorable...and awesome

Living Off The Grid

Source: http://www.idealhomegarden.com

The more adorable side of conservation

Remember the three R’s: reduce, reuse and recycle?  Well, I just realized that they are listed in order of importance. While recycling is awesome, we should really focus on reducing our consumption and, in the example below, reusing the things we already have.  

This little piece of wall art hangs next to my sink at the Armstrong House Education Center to instruct my guests of our sponge reuse policy. I cannot take credit for this – it was inspired by a friend of mine. Feel free to replicate.  Stay tuned for more adorable conservation-based wall art in the future.  Send me yours and I will post it on the Blog.

Setting goals

Last week’s post was about a weed called mile-a-minute vine that is spreading through our forests and killing other plants.  I began my last post with the musing ‘what is a weed?’  The word ‘weed’ isn’t technically a botanical term; there is not a group of plants that botanists have described as ‘weeds’.  Instead, weeds – or undesirable plants – are only weeds within a certain context.  For example, a dandelion growing along the railroad tracks may not be considered a weed, but as soon as it pops up in your lawn it certainly is.  Likewise, sugar maple seeds are very welcome to germinate in the forest, but the gardener will rip them up once they sprout among her kale.

Dandelion, a common weed.  

From these examples you can see that a plant’s context is what makes them a weed and their weediness usually stands in our way of achieving a goal.  For example, the gardener is trying to raise some food for her family.  Garden=context.  Food=goal.  Weeds=reduce food production.  Once there is a context and a goal is set, weeds take form.  Once a person builds a garden and is committed to growing some food, plants like lady’s thumb and sorrel automatically become the weeds, simply because these plants grow quickly in full sun and can crowd out our vegetables.  It really has nothing to do with the plants themselves, their weediness is simply a result of our decision to keep a garden.  No gardens, no weeds. Simple.

The mandala garden at the Armstrong House Education Center, where we get our fair share of weeds growing among the desirable vegetables and herbs.  

Lets think bigger than our backyard garden.  What are our goals for Pound Ridge’s land?  Once we set some town wide goals, our town wide weeds will take form.   Believe it or not, conservation is a bit like gardening.  Conservationists, just like gardeners, decide what we want to remove from the land, what we want to keep on the land and how we want the land to appear/ work.  Of course, its easier to control your backyard garden than something huge and complex like a forest or a watershed, but the principle is identical.  Gardeners and conservationists follow the same process: we identify our context, set our goals and manage our weeds.

So I’ll ask you again, what are our goals for the garden of Pound Ridge?

It is safe to say that the people of Pound Ridge have at least one common goal: forests.  People move here because of our beautiful trees.  Our forests are pleasing to look at, give our homes privacy, provide us with shade in the summer, keep our soil in place, provide food and shelter for hundreds of forests critters and dazzle our eyes in the fall with their colors.  Honestly, our honorary membership in Southern New England would be revoked if we didn’t have such forests – the New England states would simply laugh us off stage.  Beyond all these reasons, we must admit that there is something magical about forests that touch our soul.  Can we all agree, then, that we like our forests?

An artsy photograph I took of a forest in Pound Ridge, NY.  We surely love our trees around here.    

So back to our formula.  Context= Pound Ridge.  Goal= a forest full of trees.  Weed=?
This is easy. The greatest threat to our trees is the cute and fuzzy white tailed deer, period.  At their current density, virtually ZERO NEW TREES are being recruited into the forest.  Sure, we have trees now (fewer by the storm, mind you) but we will have less in twenty years, far fewer in fifty years and in one hundred years Pound Ridge will be hanging onto its forested past via a few giants.  Good bye New England, hello NY metro.

A white tailed deer browsing a tree branch

What will our future landscape look like?
In general, the forest will grow older and older and without new recruits, we will see a large gap in the age demographics of the trees.  The youngest trees we have now (roughly 10-15 years old), will always be the forest’s youngest trees.  Therefore, in 50 years, the youngest trees will be 65 years old, standing over an understory that is open, bare, and sparsely vegetated.  Instead of an understory of native trees, we will have extensive shrub thickets of deer resistant invasive plants (Japanese barberry, wine berry, multiflora rose) under an aging canopy.

What’s the gardener to do?               
As conservationist/gardeners we have to decide what we want our landscape to look like in 20, 50 and 100 years.  Once we set our goals, lets get to work managing our weeds.  I, for one, vote for trees.

If you are new to this white tail deer conversation, there are plenty of resources to become acquainted with.  See below.  If you are a veteran of this conversation, what are you doing to grow more trees?  I currently have 40 young trees growing in a small nursery at the Armstrong House Education Center.  Soon I’ll have 60.  In addition to planting native trees, maybe we should come together as a town and do something about our deer.  These weeds are certainly within our power to manage.  

Deer related resources:

Background ecological information
http://www.na.fs.fed.us/fhp/special_interests/white_tailed_deer.pdf
http://www.duke.edu/web/nicholas/bio217/ekc7/deer.htm                       
           
Local conservation groups measuring the effect of deer on plants
http://www.mianus.org/2012/07/main-deer-exclosure-is-now-open-to-public/

Deer hunting in Pound Ridge, NY
http://www.townofpoundridge.com/boardsandcommissions/deer-management-pound-ridge

Conversations about effective control measures
http://www.mianus.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/RECORDREVIEW3.9.10_Contraceptive_darts_may_hold_key_to_managing_deer_population.pdf

Know your weeds.

I didn’t always know that any plant could be considered a weed.  I thought that all weeds shared a similar physiology, evolution or life cycle which united them into an unpopular class of plants.  This is not true.  A weed is just a plant that, for some reason or another, people don’t like: its perceived as useless, clogs underground plumbing, costs us money, mires our farm equipment, out competes more desirable plants, poisons our livestock, shades our crops, etc.  What’s more, a weed in one location – intentionally killed, uprooted, and criticized – may be coveted elsewhere.  A plant’s weediness really all depends on who you ask and what they want.

So ask an ecologists what they want and they will say ‘diversity’.  Diversity is coveted by ecologists because, by definition, it suggests that many organisms are alive and well and it ensures an ecosystem’s productivity and resilience.  Essentially, if extinction is the enemy, diversity is our greatest ally.  Ecologists, as well as anybody, know about weeds.  Here in the forests of northern Westchester there are weeds which threaten to decrease its diversity.  You may have heard them referred to as ‘invasive species’.  Today’s post is about one in particular: mile-a-minute Vine (Persicaria perfoliata).

A great poster showing all parts of the mile-a-minute vine.  Learn how to identify this weed in the field. 

        
Aptly named, this plant from Asia can grow, grow, grow over everything in its path.  With its little barbs (see picture) it can successfully hang onto the leaves, stems, and stalks of other plants as it rapidly grows up and over them.  Through research it has been shown to decrease local diversity…very weedy indeed.  Its an annual plant which means that it overwinters as a seed; the plant’s vegetative parts do not persist for multiple years.  To stop this plant from spreading we need to halt its production of seeds.

Right now, the third week of August 2012, the mile-a-minute vine on the Armstrong Preserve are about to flower – I can see their swollen flower buds ready to erupt.  Remember back to elementary school biology – first come the flowers, then come the seeds.  In order to stop this plant from spreading we have to kill it before it makes seeds.  In other words, we have to kill it now.

Removing mile-a-minute vine is not necessarily difficult.  Using work gloves, you can easily pull the plant out of the ground.  BE SURE TO PULL OUT THE PLANT’S ROOTS.  If you break the stem, plant material left in the ground will begin to grow again.  It is inevitable to miss or break some vines, so get in the habit if revisiting sites a week or so after you pull vines, just to clean up any remaining plants.  After you pull the plant out of the ground you have to put it some place where it will desiccate and die (on a stone wall, driveway, etc.).    

A patch of densely growing mile-a-minute vine

If we miss our opportunity to kill this plant before it flowers and sets seed, it is likely to gain more traction in our area.  Patrol your property and spend an hour or two removing this ecological weed.  If you don’t steward your own backyard, no one else will.  
For more information on mile-a-minute vine, see these on line resources:
http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/pepe1.htm
http://www.hort.uconn.edu/mam/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persicaria_perfoliata

Partnering with cover crops

What do you do when your feeling run down?  Some people need comfort food or a warm bath. Others sleep more or pop a packet of ‘Emergen-C‘.  As we mature, we all learn how to alleviate our own exhaustion.  We are not the only thing that gets run down and exhausted; we are a lot like soil in this respect.  As it turns out, our health and the health of soil are both influenced by the relative amounts of vitamins, carbon and water we contain.  When one of these gets thrown out of balance, bad things can happen.  To a gardener, exhausted soil looks like poor fruit production, sickly and discolored plants, and erosion.  The question then – and the topic of today’s post – is: how do we recharge our soil?  How do we restore its vitality so that our crops thrive and be bountiful?  There are many soil conditioning methods, but one way in particular honors this month’s thread of ‘partnerships‘.  Cover cropping.

A sick girl.  Like us, our soil can become run down and unhealthy.  Unhealthy soil needs attention and conditioning.  

Cover cropping is the act of planting beneficial plants in between cycles of crop plants.  Cover crops are diverse and plenty; rye, barley, various oats, clovers of all types, alfalfa, peas, buckwheat, reed canary grass, wheat, millet, soybean, vetch, kale, turnip and flax are just a few.  Each performs a unique job and benefits the soil in its own way.  For instance, rye is used through the winter to reduce erosion while barley ‘scavenges’ nitrogen from the soil (a good way to keep it from leaching or volatilizing).  Here is a great website that explains the various benefits of cover crops.  However your soil is acting run down, there is a cover crop that you can partner with to help it.          
This book is commonly referred to on the internet.  It is geared toward larger gardens and farms yet is still very informative and worth consulting if you are interested in managing your soil with cover crops.  

This spring and summer at the Armstrong House Education Center we used three cover crops to rejuvenate our garden’s soil.

1) Peas (Pisum sativum).  Peas (along with the common clover, alfalfa and soybeans) are in the fabaceae or ‘pea’ family.  Like most plants in the fabaceae, peas are capable of taking gaseous nitrogen out of the atmosphere and converting it to a form of nitrogen usable by plants in a process called ‘nitrogen fixation’.  You may have heard of this famous group of agricultural plants commonly referred to as ‘nitrogen fixers’ which actively increase the amount of nitrogen in the soil.  These plants provide us with an alternative to store bought, synthetic fertilizers, which have been shown to enter waterways and negatively effect aquatic ecosystems.

The flower of our pea cover crop.  Not only does this plant add nitrogen to the soil, it produces edible pea pods.  

2) Oats (Avena sativa).  These are called ‘nurse’ plants because they help the peas get established and grow.  The oats grow very quickly and suppress weeds while the relatively slower growing peas can develop and also act as scaffolding for the pea vines to grow upon.  After they die, the oats add carbon and nitrogen to the soil.  The peas and oats came together in this package.

3) Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum).   This fast growing plant suppresses weeds and is good at scavenging soil phosphorus and calcium, thereby keeping it from being washed away.  I have found that many insects are attracted to the white flowers of buckwheat.  On warm summer days I was amazed to see well over a dozen species of flying insects working the buckwheat flowers.  Among them were the Armstrong honeybees, which will be supported into the nectar-limited fall by our abundant beds of buckwheat.  We currently use buckwheat from Botanical Interests.

How to manage cover crops?
Each cover crop is managed differently.  How/where/when to sow crops varies among the plants, as does growing time and method for killing.  Generally, we sow cover crops from seed allow them to live for a preferred amount of time and then kill them.  The plants themselves are either left to decompose in the garden or composted.

At the Armstrong House garden, I allowed our peas, oats and buckwheat to flower before turning them into the soil (roughly 6 weeks of growing time).  To reduce the amount of bulky organic material I had to work in, I cut and composted the top halves and allowed the bottom halves to decompose in place for 2 weeks.  After these two weeks, I chopped up the remaining stems into very small pieces and literally raked them into the soil as I sowed a new crop of buckwheat.    

Future cover crops?
After the current cycle of buckwheat is ready to turn into the soil we will plant crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum) as a winter cover crop.  After germination, the clover will over winter in the garden and bloom in the early spring.  We choose this cover crop because it is a nitrogen fixer and a source of early spring nectar for our honeybees.

We will continue to use a variety of cover crops at the Armstrong House Education Center as we learn more about our soil’s needs.  Think about what causes you to feel sick.  You make suffer from the flu, chicken pox, strep throat, arthritis, sciatica, or depression.  Each illness is remedied differently.  Likewise, in the future we may employ cover crops to perform different jobs such as erosion control, adding nutrients or organic material, honeybee forage or breaking up of compacted soil.  Check the blog or come to an event in our garden to see our current cover crop.
                

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