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Volunteer Work Session Removes Invasive Plants from Three Acres at Armstrong

We held two volunteer work sessions for Invasive Species Awareness Week at the Armstrong Preserve and Education Center, where we manage a series of outdoor classrooms as native habitats.  Five people attended the Saturday session and twelve came out on Thursday July 13.  With 9 students and 3 retired volunteers, plus 3 PRLC board members, we successfully met our goal of removing invasive shrubs from three acres of the Preserve!

IMG_20170713_093844247IMG_20170713_093759486Barberry alive in pile

Over the course of a few hours on two mornings, we removed barberry, bittersweet, wineberry, mile-a-minute, and more from the Armstrong vernal pool, meadow, and in the forest along the blue and white trails.  Additional work by our summer interns will proceed along the yellow trail next.  Please sign up at landsteward@prlc.net to join us.

Kiosk map

 

Pound Ridge Targets Invasive Species for I.S. Awareness Week

Concerned organizations in Northern Westchester have scheduled three events in Pound Ridge to

acknowledge Invasive Species Awareness Week, July 9 – 15. On July 11, from 6:45 to 8 p.m., the

Pound Ridge Library, 271 Westchester Ave, and The Invasives Project will host an introduction to

invasive species with a video, Are Alien Plants Bad?, featuring Doug Tallamy. A ‘tasting’ of edible

invasive plants and informal discussion will follow the video. The event is free and open to the

public. Dr. Tallamy, Professor of Entomology at the University of Delaware, is the author of Bringing

Nature Home, the seminal work on the importance of native plants in our ecosystems and the dangers

posed by invasive species.

 

The second event, sponsored by the Pound Ridge Land Conservancy, is an in-the- field working

session at the Armstrong Preserve, 1361 Old Post Road. On July 13, from 10 a.m. to noon,

volunteers will learn how to identify and manage several invasive plants, including mile-a- minute

weed, phragmites, Oriental bittersweet, Japanese barberry, wineberry, Japanese stiltgrass, garlic

mustard, multiflora rose and others. To register for this event, contact Krista Munger at

landsteward@prlc.net.

 

The final event, another working session, is sponsored by the Westchester Land Trust and takes

place on July 15 from 9 a.m. to noon at the Zofnass Family Preserve/Westchester Wilderness Walk

in Pound Ridge. Volunteers will be led by the New York-New Jersey Trail Conference’s Strike Force

Linda Rohleder, Lower Hudson Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (LH-PRISM)

Email: lrohleder@nynjtc.org

Phone: 201-512- 9348 Ex. 821

Conservation Corps crew, who will provide on-the- job training, enabling participants to recognize

invasive plants and learn how to manage them on their own properties. Participants should bring

work gloves and drinking water. Please register at http://nynjtc.org/events.

The Invasives Project, Pound Ridge Land Conservancy and Westchester Land Trust are members of

the Lower Hudson PRISM (our local Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management), a

group of concerned organizations and individuals who work together under the auspices of the New

York State Department of Environmental Conservation to prevent or minimize the harm caused by

invasive species. The eight PRISMs in New York State coordinate invasive species management,

recruit and train citizen volunteers, provide education and outreach, establish early detection

monitoring networks and implement direct eradication and control efforts. For more information,

see lhprism.org.

Support Native Plants in Halle Ravine by Volunteering with the PRLC

AlizahPlease join us for wildflower planting at Halle Ravine on Saturday, June 3rd, 10am to noon (link to directions).  Families and non-gardeners are welcome to participate and to learn more about the value of our native plants and what they can do to bring in more birds and butterflies at home.  Volunteers can assist with planting, watering, or removing non-native invasive species.  We will have more than 200 plants on hand, all grown from locally collected seed and raised at the Armstrong Preserve and Education Center’s native plant nursery.  Please bring a shovel or garden trowel if you have one.  We will have some to share.

Our goal is to establish a native plant community in place of the thick stand of invasives that formerly dominated the entrance and pond edges.  Wildflowers will help to fill space between the 200 young tree and shrub saplings that were planted during our Arbor Day Celebration last month, anchoring and shielding the soil while providing food for insects and birds.  We hope to see these native plants become established and to begin to spread outside of their protective deer cages next year.  Please email Krista if you would like to volunteer your gardening, photography, or other skills to this project on another date (landsteward@prlc.net).

IMG_5389This volunteer event is part of our larger restoration efforts at Halle Ravine and is supported with funding from neighbors like you and by the New York State Conservation Partnership Program (NYSCPP) and New York’s Environmental Protection Fund. The NYSCPP in administered by the Land Trust Alliance, in coordination with the state Department of Environmental Conservation.

 

 

Native Plant-Insect Associations of Species Selected for Halle Ravine Restoration Planting

Common name Latin name Bees Butterflies Moths Other Notable species
Blue-stem goldenrod Solidago caesia x x
Cardinal Flower Lobelia cardinalis x Ruby-throated hummingbird, Swallowtail butterflies
Climbing boneset Mikania scandens x x x
Columbine Aquilegia canadensis x x Ruby-throated hummingbird
Common boneset Eupatorium perfoliatum x x Baltimore checkerspot butterfly
Common heartleaf aster Symphyotrichum cordifolium x American lady, Pearl crescent, Saddleback caterpillar
Evening primrose Oenothera x x x
Figwort species Scrophularia x
Flat topped aster Doellingeria umbellate x American lady, Pearl crescent
Gray goldenrod Solidago nemoralis x x x
Great blue lobelia Lobelia siphilitica x
Horse mint Monarda punctata x
Meadowsweet Spirea alba x x x
Tall meadow rue Thalictrum pubescens x
White wood aster Eurybea divaricatus x American lady, Pearl crescent
Wild bergamot Monarda fistulosa x x x

 

Community Celebration of Arbor Day at Halle Ravine

Arbor Day 2017 Al and Vita (1)Pound Ridge’s Arbor Day Tree Planting and Celebration at Halle Ravine on April 28, 2017 was a grand success!  Twenty-five people planted two hundred trees and shrubs in designated areas around the northern-most pond, which is visible from Trinity Pass near the Preserve entrance.  We are grateful for their service in helping us to achieve our goal to enhance native understory forest in a 1.5 acre area that we just cleared of invasive Winged euonymus (aka Burningbush), with the long term plan of supporting native songbirds and other wildlife through habitat management.

IMG_20170501_130802185

We received funding for this work from the New York State Conservation Partnership Program (NYSCPP) and New York’s Environmental Protection Fund. The NYSCPP in administered by the Land Trust Alliance, in coordination with the state Department of Environmental Conservation.  We also partnered with the Town of Pound Ridge Conservation Board, the Henry Morgenthau Nature Preserve, The Invasives Project-Pound Ridge, and our local troop of Girl Scouts for this event.  Members of the Pound Ridge Garden Club generously donated a shuttle service to and from the Town Park, to alleviate the limited parking situation at Halle, and they helped to plant as well.  Special guest Brad Gurr of Bartlett Tree Experts donated 100 oak and sycamore saplings and taught volunteers how to properly plant them.  New York State Electric and Gas donated Eastern redbud saplings, and PRLC’s Prop Lab grew many others like Elderberry, Swamp rose, and Buttonbush.

Plantings were flagged temporarily for identification and watering, and most will be fenced from deer with either individual cages or perimeter fencing.  We plan to add flowering herbaceous plants to these sites at our June 3 Volunteer Work Session to support pollinator insects and nectarivores.  Please join us in supporting the restoration of Halle Ravine’s native forests by pitching in as a volunteer or making a donation to our Spring Fundraiser.  This is a wonderful way to meet your neighbors and enjoy the woodlands we hold dear.

More pics coming soon!

 

 

 

Trail improvements at Richards Preserve

IMG_20170401_114905140Ten volunteers helped out at our April 1 work session held at the Richards Preserve.  A team of four installed a water bar at the entrance to divert storm water from flowing into and eroding the trail system.  Another team of four worked to create natural dams and obstructions that will capture sediment eroding from trails.  Then, we all joined forces to remove Japanese barberry, an invasive shrub, from the entrance to the Preserve.  We received grant funds from the Watershed Agricultural Council to clear barberry from one acre there this year.   We also received funding from the Land Trust Alliance in support of our work to provide public access at Richards and to maintain the health of its habitats.  Fortunately, the rest of this beautiful older-growth forest is free of invasives.   Take the loop trail in either direction, and make sure to take in the reservoir view from the far end.

 

Carolin's Grove is on the Road to Restoration

Have you driven past Carolin’s Grove recently and noticed the work we have done to clear out some of treefall from Hurricane Sandy? Well, it’s time to stop in and take a few minutes to see the change. With funding from the family of the original donors of this Preserve and support from the Land Trust Alliance, we hired a tree crew, Emerald Organic, to remove dead and downed trees that prevented us from accessing the area for management of invasive species and native plant protection. This part of the forest is now safe for visitors to explore.

Carolin's Grove 2012First day of work Feb 8 2017April 5 2017 (3)

While there are large gaps among the towering spruce trees in the Grove, there are also many young saplings, some already above the height of deer browse.  We aim to influence the regeneration of this forest to include a mix of deciduous trees and conifers, with berry and nut producing shrubs in the understory to support birds and other wildlife.  This month and next, volunteers and students including the entire third grade at Pound Ridge Elementary School will help to plant in the largest forest gaps.  More volunteers are always welcome, including those who can stop by and water during dry periods in summer.

March 13 2017 2April 5 2017 2

We have White pine, Pitch pine, Eastern red cedar, American hazelnut and Northern bayberry saplings to plant, some of which were donated by the New York State School Seedling Program.  We are also going to plant wildflowers that are important for pollinating insects, such as Grey goldenrod, Milkweed, and Wild bergamot, grown in our own native plant nursery at the Armstrong Preserve and Education Center.  Please see this blog post for more information on the PRLC Prop Lab.

IMG_20160411_115634987Wild bergamotIMG_20170407_174832993

Volunteers Dig in at Clark Preserve

IMG_20170304_102810773_HDRFive new student volunteers stayed warm by working hard at our first Saturday Volunteer Work Session of the year last week at the Clark Preserve.  We worked together to clear Japanese barberry and other invasive plant species from an area near the entrance to the preserve, on Autumn Ridge Road in Pound Ridge. The students were able to draw connections between what they saw and learned about in the forest, and what they have in their yards at home.  They asked important questions: “how did invasive species get here?” (They were brought in by nurseries for sale as landscaping plants, in many cases.)  And, the kids want to know what is edible, trying out garlic mustard and onion grass and black birch.  We talked about making syrup from Sugar maples, and how you can know you are looking at a maple even at this time of year (by the buds and pattern of branching).  Curiosity flows freely in the outdoors.

We are grateful for the assistance of volunteers in maintaining the health of this seventy acre forest, and we look forward to spending more time out on the land this season.  Join for our next Saturday Volunteer Work Session on April 1 at Richard’s Preserve on Honey Hollow Road, 10am to noon.  We will be making improvements to the entrance to the preserve including installation of a water bar to direct road runoff out of the trail.  Please bring a shovel if you have one, and wear long sleeves and pants for protection from thorns.

Barberry at ClarkIMG_20170304_102857738

Announcing PRLC's Summer 2017 Internship Openings

PRLC is pleased to announce two paid internships available in Summer 2017.  We seek to provide a direct hands-on learning experience in nature preservation to two college students in the Environmental Studies or a similar field of study.  Our interns participate in trail maintenance, habitat protection, and scientific research projects.  They also act as tour guides to work sites, document and develop site plans, and present a summary of their work to the local community at season’s end.

This year, we offer internships in Preserve Stewardship and Environmental Restoration.  The Preserve Stewardship Intern will range across our eight preserves with trails and will visit other sites protected for their conservation value.  The Environmental Restoration Intern will help us to grow native plant stock in our home nursery at the Armstrong Preserve and Education Center and to plant and maintain restoration areas at select PRLC preserves, including Halle Ravine, Carolin’s Grove, and Clark Preserves.  We also welcome high school students who have the opportunity to volunteer as interns during the last month of their senior year.  Please see our Internships page for more information and instructions on how to apply.

Be Inspired: Citizen Science and Volunteer Forum

Seren at OverlookThe Pound Ridge Land Conservancy invites nature lovers of all ages to attend our Citizen Science and Volunteer Forum on February 26, 6pm, at the Armstrong Preserve and Education Center in Pound Ridge.  Discover opportunities to help land managers and scientists using your phone, camera, laptop, or simple tools.  Find an internship or volunteer position with the PRLC or one of our partners.  Our guest speakers will inspire you to become involved and join with others to make a difference in the world.  

This year, we feature Akiko Busch, author of The Incidental Steward: Reflections on Citizen Science.  Ms. Busch is a Hudson Valley resident who conveys a deep sense of place in her writing.  She will read an excerpt from her book and discuss the crucial role that volunteers play in maintaining our ecosystems.  

We will also hear from local scientists and project directors, including Shaun McCoshum and Carolyn Sears.  Dr. McCoshum currently works for the Westchester Land Trust as the Preserve Manager and Educator. He has earned a PhD in Zoology and is an active citizen scientist and formal researcher who uses data from Citizen Science programs.  Dr. Sears is a former educator and co-founder of The Invasives Project – Pound Ridge.  She will describe plans for a community volunteer effort to use goats to manage Japanese knotweed, an invasive plant species.

Participation is free although prior registration is suggested.  Please contact Krista at landsteward.educator@prlc.net or 914-205-3533 to register and to receive a digital copy of the Environmentalist’s Guide to Local Volunteer Resources and Citizen Science Projects.

For the Birds

winter-red-bellied-woodpecker-jennifer-wosmanskyDo you put seed out for birds in winter?  Millions of Americans enjoy this hobby, even those who might not otherwise be nature-lovers.  We string up suet for woodpeckers and scatter sunflower seed, millet, or corn to attract our personal favorites, perhaps the cardinal, or goldfinches.  Some birds are finicky about visiting feeders, and we delight in adding another species to our list – mine is currently at eleven for 2017, but should reach fifteen or so before winter is over.  I like to watch the Red-bellied woodpeckers, which are much more numerous this year than last.  They are expanding their range further north as our winters grow more mild.

coopers-hawk-adultWhen I visit my mother in Vermont in a few days, I look forward to seeing her regular birds, so different from mine:  crossbills and snow buntings, and red-breasted nuthatch.  I might see a Cooper’s hawk in either location as they too have expanded their range, to prey on the birds that we attract to our feeders!

Some of you may wonder, is it necessary to feed birds, and can it be harmful?  There are no conclusive data showing its benefit or harm to bird populations, although centralized feeding areas can be reservoirs for the spread of disease.  It is a good idea to scrub down your feeder periodically, and to offer fresh water if you are providing any.  The availability of water is a limiting factor for bird distribution, especially during freezes in winter, when I find dense concentrations of birds near flowing streams.  Will the birds starve if you stop feeding them or miss a few days?  Unlikely.  Their numbers are determined by many factors in addition to food, and birds are adapted to move and forage over a wide area.

It is more important to support birds with a healthy habitat of native trees and plants than it is to provide supplementary foods in any season.  Trees moderate our climate, provide shade and shelter and seed, and most critically, harbor vast numbers of insects.   Some birds are almost entirely insectivorous, like the Eastern 028bluebird, while others depend upon insects for short periods of growth and transition.  According to entomologist Doug Tallamy, ninety-six percent of terrestrial birds rear their young on insects, especially caterpillars.  Many non-native plants do not support the kind or number of caterpillars that birds need, and when those plants become numerous enough to compete with native plants for space and light, the number of birds on the landscape will be diminished.  Even non-native plants that appear to feed birds, like Asiatic bittersweet, can be low-quality food sources that provide less nutrition than native plants.  We have seen a tremendous increase in the number and diversity of birds at the Armstrong Preserve and Education Center after we replaced our invasive non-native plants with native species.

Here is a list of things you can do to attract songbirds to your property, including suggested native plants for food sources, taken in part from bird habitat specialist Dr. Stephen Kress:

  1. Maintain a border of native trees and shrubs around lawns, and minimize the area of lawn.
  2. Create a brush pile.
  3. Remove invasive plants.
  4. Rake leaves under shrubs to create feeding areas.
  5. Clean out bird nesting boxes in early spring.
  6. Create a water source for bathing and drinking.
  7. Clean feeders with a 10% non-chlorine bleach solution.
  8. Keep cats indoors.

Spring and Summer Seed Producers = Red maple, American elm

Early Summer Fruit Producers = Black raspberry, High and Lowbush blueberry, Pokeweed, Shadbush

Autumn Seed Producers = Sugar maple, Eastern hophornbeam, the ashes

Autumn Fruit Producers = viburnums, dogwoods, Common elderberry, Spicebush

Winter Fruit Producers = Bayberry, Eastern red-cedar, Highbush cranberry, American holly, Inkberry,  chokeberry, Wild grape, Virginia creeper, Winterberry, Staghorn sumac

Herbaceous plants = asters, Black-eyed susan, thistles, phloxes, sunflowers, goldenrods

Nectar Plants for Hummingbirds = Jewelweed, Cardinal flower, Trumpet honeysuckle, Indian paintbrush, Tulip tree

 

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