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Volunteer Work Session April 14, 2018

Calling all volunteers to Isaacson Preserve on Saturday, April 14th, from 10am to noon.  We need extra hands to clip Asiatic bittersweet vines that are beginning to overtake young forest on this rare marble ridge.  It’s fairly easy and very satisfying work that anyone can do at home.  We should be in full swing of amphibian breeding and songbird migration by then, with spring ephemeral wildflowers in bloom too.  This trail-less preserve is not generally open to the public and has only one dedicated parking space.  Volunteers should park at nearby Halle Ravine and walk north along Donbrook Road onto Dogwood Hills Road (link to map).  PRLC staff will meet you at the preserve entrance near 15 Dogwood Hills Road and will have gloves and tools to share.  Please bring long-handled loppers or a handsaw if you have them.  To register for notice of weather-related cancellation and be added to our volunteer email list, please contact Krista at 914-205-3533 or landsteward.educator@prlc.net.

  

Opportunities To Get Involved In 2018

What’s on tap with the Pound Ridge Land Conservancy in 2018? Our Land Steward and Educator, Krista Munger, will present a series of free educational and service events at PRLC nature preserves starting with our annual Citizen Science and Volunteer Forum on February 25 at the Armstrong Preserve and Education Center.  We will feature local turtle conservation projects that incorporate volunteers and will be recruiting interns and volunteers for our summer program.  Letters of interest about internships may be addressed to Krista at landsteward@prlc.net.  Volunteers of all ages are always welcome.  We hold our first Saturday volunteer work session on March 3 at 10am at the Clark Preserve.  Please register ahead to receive notice of cancellation or change due to weather. 

Hiking trails are open ever day from dawn to dusk at the following PRLC preserves: Armstrong, Bye, Carolin’s Grove, Clark, Halle Ravine, Richards, and Russell.  Please leash dogs for safety and to protect wildlife.  For questions on our dog policy please email us at info@prlc.net.

Date Time Type of Event Location Title
2/25 6pm-730pm Outreach Armstrong Volunteer Recruitment Night: Special topic on opportunities to become involved in local turtle conservation projects
3/3 10am-12pm Volunteer Work Session Clark Invasive Species Management: Remove barberry to maintain watershed forest health
4/14 10am-12pm Volunteer Work Session Isaacson Invasive Species Management: Autumn olive and Asiatic bittersweet
4/22 2pm-4pm Guided Hike Armstrong Earth Day Tour of Vernal Pool and Woodland Wildflowers
4/27 10am-4pm Volunteer Work Session Carolin’s Grove Arbor Day Celebration and Tree Planting
5/5 10am-12pm Volunteer Work Session Halle Ravine Invasive Species Management: Follow up on Euonymus and Bittersweet Cutting
5/20 2pm-4pm Guided Hike Halle Ravine Big Trees: Saving Ash and Hemlock in an Ancient Forest
6/2 10am-12pm Volunteer Work Session Armstrong Invasive Species Management: Garlic Mustard Challenge and Species Identification Training
6/10 2-4pm Guided Hike Bye Preserve A Second Look at Ferns and Mosses

Halle Ravine Volunteer Projects

img_20161001_111157107 A dozen community members assisted in native plant restoration at Halle Ravine at our most recent Volunteer Work Session on October 1.  A lively group of students, neighbors, town officials, and PRLC board members spent the morning working on and off trails in the north end of the Preserve and along the steep bank of the eastern side of the ravine.  They cleared invasive weeds, planted a variety of native plants that will better support wildlife, and fenced valuable trees and shrubs from deer browse.  Our aim is to encourage more shade cover in the Preserve to protect soils from erosion and drought and to provide for the needs of animals.  Come out for a tour with us next summer and see the results!

We also completed the installation of a new staircase along the steepest section of trail in the Preserve.  Help is still needed to carry out construction materials and begin bridge repairs, so please join us on Saturday November 5, 10am-noon to lend a hand.

 

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These projects were supported by funding from the Land Trust Alliance Conservation Partnership Program and by private donors.

 

Fall Mushrooms at Armstrong Preserve, Pound Ridge NY

We had a great turnout for the mushroom hike at Armstrong Preserve on October 23, 2016 and turned up some interesting finds.  The most distinctive was a single specimen of the Dog stinkhorn, Mutinus ravenii, so-named for its shape and strong odor.  We also found a few edibles, noted in the captions below.  Please use caution when foraging for wild mushrooms and refrain from eating any that are not verified by an expert.  Please also note that collection of mushrooms, along with plants and animals, is not permitted on Pound Ridge Land Conservancy preserves except during our guided hikes.  If you would like to join our email list to be notified of future mushroom forays, email PRLC’s land steward or call our office at 914-205-3533.

Thank you to our event participants for the photographs, and happy hunting!

Fomes fomentarius-tinder polypore

Fomes fomentarius-tinder polypore

Ishnoderma resinosum

Mutinus ravenelii,dog stinkhorn

 

 

 

Panellus serotinus, late fall oyster, edible but not choice

Panellus serotinus, late fall oyster, edible but not choice

Under side of Panellus serotinus, late fall oyster, edible but not choice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phlebia radiata

Pholiota sqarrosoides, edible

 

Pleurotus ostreatus, oyster mushroom, choice edible

Pleurotus ostreatus, oyster mushroom, choice edible

Russula xerampelina, edible but not recommended, use caution

Russula xerampelina, edible but not recommended, use caution

underside of Russula xerampelina, edible but not recommended, use caution

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tyromyces chioneus

Tyromyces chioneus

 

 

 

 

Cool Weather Gardening

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We greatly expanded our growing area this spring and summer at the Armstrong Education Center and have been reaping the fruits of our labor, both in the organic vegetable garden and in our native plant gardens.  These gardens are used to demonstrate sustainable land use concepts such as local food production for humans, honeybees, and other wildlife.  

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The plants have enjoyed our lovely fall weather and produced a late abundance of fruit and blossoms.  This summer was persistently cool and cloudy, which allowed for an extended planting season but also delayed or stunted blooming.  It also encouraged plant predation by insects.  Our vegetable gardens sustained heavy damage early on from Colorado potato beetles and the Squash vine borer (see my earlier blog post about how to keep squash producing into fall).  Later, we had difficultly controlling the Mexican bean beetle and caterpillars on the cole crops.  Not even our resident bull frog, pictured here, could keep them in check.  Because we strive to strike a balance with insect populations as part of the web of life, we use only organic methods in our gardens and attempt to deter them mainly through crop rotation and mulching.

IMG_20140901_192513898_HDRWhen things get out of hand, my tried-and-true method for organic pest control in the garden is to make "bug juice," also known as "sick juice."  I collect as many of the offenders as I can in a small jar with a lid.  I puree these in a little water in an old blender that I have reserved for this use.  Then I strain this liquid through a fine sieve and pour it into a spray bottle.  I use the rinse water from the blender jar (after it has been sieved) to dilute the liquid further.  Then I spray this on plants that are affected by that particular insect.  This is basically biological warfare: the premise being that one of the bugs in the mixture will carry a disease that then quickly spreads through the entire population.  This works on insects that have become overabundant on any kind of plant, including this native milkweed that has been infested with aphids.

milkweed with aphids

See our website calendar for a list of events you can attend for hands-on education on how to manage your own property with a Living Lighter on the Land mindset.  Learn how your activities can support the Pound Ridge's efforts to become a certified Community Wildlife Habitat, and please join our mailing list or like our facebook page for news and updates related to local conservation initiatives.

Chores still to be done at this time:

  • Plant winter rye as a cover crop, or mulch beds with shredded leaves covered by straw.
  • Plant trees and shrubs, and consider adding support until roots are set next year.
  • Create a leaf pile for a steady source of Fall mulch and Spring seed-sowing medium.
  • Harvest fall crops such as spinach, lettuce, and kale, and keep those beds covered at night.