invasive species

Volunteers Dig in at Clark Preserve

IMG_20170304_102810773_HDRFive new student volunteers stayed warm by working hard at our first Saturday Volunteer Work Session of the year last week at the Clark Preserve.  We worked together to clear Japanese barberry and other invasive plant species from an area near the entrance to the preserve, on Autumn Ridge Road in Pound Ridge. The students were able to draw connections between what they saw and learned about in the forest, and what they have in their yards at home.  They asked important questions: “how did invasive species get here?” (They were brought in by nurseries for sale as landscaping plants, in many cases.)  And, the kids want to know what is edible, trying out garlic mustard and onion grass and black birch.  We talked about making syrup from Sugar maples, and how you can know you are looking at a maple even at this time of year (by the buds and pattern of branching).  Curiosity flows freely in the outdoors.

We are grateful for the assistance of volunteers in maintaining the health of this seventy acre forest, and we look forward to spending more time out on the land this season.  Join for our next Saturday Volunteer Work Session on April 1 at Richard’s Preserve on Honey Hollow Road, 10am to noon.  We will be making improvements to the entrance to the preserve including installation of a water bar to direct road runoff out of the trail.  Please bring a shovel if you have one, and wear long sleeves and pants for protection from thorns.

Barberry at ClarkIMG_20170304_102857738

April Volunteer Work Session at Richard's Preserve

img_20160507_102953404Date: Saturday April 1, 2017

Time: 10 am to noon

Location: Richard’s Preserve on Honey Hollow Road, Pound Ridge

If  you haven’t been to the beautiful and pristine Richard’s Preserve, allow this work session to be your introduction.  We need volunteer help to repair a short section of trail and to control an infestation of invasive species coming in from the roadside.  Please bring a shovel and sturdy work gloves (some provided).  Meet at the Preserve kiosk on Honey Hollow Road near house #134.  RSVP to landsteward.educator@prlc.net or call 914-205-3533.

The PRLC is a member of the Hudson Valley Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (PRISM), a working group that strives to collectively address invasive species issues for the protection of biodiversity and environmental systems.

 

May Volunteer Work Session at Russell Preserve

Date:  Saturday May 6, 2017

Time: 10am to noon

Location:  Russell Preserve on High Ridge Road near the intersection with Upper Shad Road.  Parking is available across the street from the entrance to the Preserve.

Calling all volunteers to the beautiful but little-known Russell Preserve, located on High Ridge Road.  We need extra hands to tackle an invasion of bittersweet vines along the pond shore and to plant native plants in its place.  Please bring a pair of loppers and work gloves (some will be provided) and RSVP for parking tips and weather related information: landsteward.educator@prlc.net or 914-205-3533

The PRLC is a member of the Hudson Valley Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (PRISM), a working group that strives to collectively address invasive species issues for the protection of biodiversity and environmental systems.

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

EABApril is Invasive Pest and Disease Awareness Month, and a task force of the United States Department of Agriculture seeks to raise awareness of the threat of invasive species to ecosystems, the economy, and to our own well-being.  Their website has excellent photographs of two main villains in our area: the Asian long-horned beetle (ALB) and the Emerald ash borer.  It says, The ALB has the potential to cause more damage than Dutch elm disease, chestnut blight and gypsy moths combined, destroying millions of acres of America’s treasured hardwoods, including national forests and backyard trees.”  

Citizen help is needed to stem the spread of known populations and to prevent new ones.  Hikers and landowners have reported several new occurrences, and if caught early enough, some cases can be eradicated.  In New York, the state has imposed a quarantine on moving firewood and certain other wood products from one location to another, and with good reason.  The map on the right shows the known distribution of the Emerald ash borer in New York.

EAB map

We have been hearing about invasive species quite a lot in our local news in Pound Ridge.  Earthworms from Europe aredepleting our soils and forest health, Mute swans (also from Europe) alter water quality and displace native wildlife, and our sources of food for birds and insects are in decline due to competition from non-native species.  We seem to have an ecosystem in peril, with the good, the bad, and the ugly in conflict.  What can we do?  One thing we cannot do is expect Mother Nature to fix the problem.  Adaptation and ecosystem balancing occur on such a long time scale that to wait is to risk massive extinctions and the loss of ecosystem services like clean water.

We can, however, draw upon the power or nature to right itself.  A healthy ecosystem naturally resists biotic invasion from pests, whether they be animal or plant, because all of the niches in the system are filled.  It is difficult for an invader to gain a foothold among the fierce competition of a thriving, co-adapted community.  The plants and animals that do become invasive were often brought here intentionally and sold for their pest-resistant properties (because our wildlife cannot eat them).

Recommendations:  We must all do our part to support diversity in native ecosystems by protecting certain areas as wildlife preserves and ensuring that those areas are connected by corridors.  This is a major concern of the PRLC.  We can also greatly expand the boundaries of protected land by choosing to landscape public and private properties with native plants to whatever extent possible, and in place of lawn.  

To learn more about the relationship between native plants and wildlife species, attend one or more of the events sponsored by PRLC and other community organizations in our four-part series, beginning April 22, Birds & Bees: Wildlife Needs.  Please also see what our neighbors are up to as we work together to certify the town as a National Wildlife Community Habitat.  

 

Birds and Bees